Four Androids Compared

[Corrected] This spring’s big buzz in the mobile world is about all the new phones running Google’s Android mobile phone system. We set the four hottest against each other.

Form and ergonomics:

Google Nexus One:

With a juicy 3.7 inch screen get undeniably expect that the phone is not very small. On the other hand, actually feels Nexus not clumsy, for it is rather thin after all. The format is pretty smooth. What is not as smooth and soon are the buttons. In principle, the Nexus just two physical buttons: the on-off button on top and a trackball below the screen. Below the screen are four touch buttons, to get to the home screen and menu functions. But because the buttons are part of the touch-screen it happens excessively often brushing against them by mistake. The handy trackball, however, is a clear plus in terms of ergonomics.

Score: 3

HTC Legend:

Wow. It was the feeling the first time I squeezed on a Legend. It was something extra. In the past, it is only in some of Nokia’s more luxurious design mobiles to received this solid metal feeling. Legend is also well in hand, and the curved shape of the bottom whereby a protection for the screen. Physical menu buttons sit below the display as well as an optical control sensor to scroll through text and menus without having to draw on the screen.

Rating: 5

Sony Ericsson X 10:

X 10 is available in black and white. The black has a matte back cover with rubber feel, while the White has a high-gloss rubber like that feels a little more simple plastic. What color you like, of course, is a matter of taste, but the black is better in your hand, I think. Of the headset, with the big screen in this test is the X 10 the most chic. But even if it looks good, it has a clear disadvantage: it lacks the trackball or touch sensor. Instead, you get to always scroll through menus and Web pages by dragging your finger on the screen. However, a plus for camera button, like the other headset in the comparison are lacking.

Score: 4

Htc Desire:

Just like the Nexus is Desire right so geek-grey in colour and form. Desire is simply a version of the HTC Google Nexus One. It’s HTC that built the Nexus One to Google, and then have to put in their own functions, fixed a few details in the design – and immediately developed a Desire-phone. The good thing about Desire versus Legend is that it has physical menu buttons below the screen instead of Nexusens a little less ergonomic touch-buttons.

Score: 4

Menus & features

Google Nexus One:

Nexus offers the basic functionality of the system Android’s newest version, and it’s a lot. The system is fast and easy to navigate. Internet applications are good, especially the browser. There is a simpler integration with Facebook in the address book, so that you can assign contacts to Facebook contacts, and then synchronised operating status and profile pictures down to the address book of your phone. When it comes to extras, however, there is not much that comes with the Nexus One.

Score: 3

HTC Legend:

HTC’s add-on features to Android have they baptized to Sense, and as the name suggests, they are designed with good sense. There are nine home screens to fill with widgets. An additional press home button leads to an overview of all the home screens. HTC has added with a whole stack of widgets, including email, weather, social networks, favorite contacts, media player, Web and more. HTC has also added with Quickoffice can view office documents. The address book link to Facebook is really well made.

Score: 4

Sony Ericsson X 10:

Sony Ericsson has used the older version 1.6 of the Android system, but in practice, it is not a particularly strong role in the phone’s features, such as the Sony Ericsson yet added the features are missing, for example, so that you can upload files (such as an image) via bluetooth. In particular, the X 10 is a lot of extra features that are missing such as the Nexus One. Timescape brings together, among other things, sms, Facebook and Twitter updates. Sony Ericsson has also added with a program that can open Microsoft Office documents – good.

Score: 4

Htc Desire:

HTC has the most different system compared to the standard version of Google’s Android system. HTC themselves call their Extras for Sense, and it includes that you get all nine home screens to fill with widgets. In addition, HTC has developed a stack of great widgets, among other things, to stay on top of email, weather, social networks, post your favorite contacts, and more. HTC has also added with Quickoffice can view office documents. The address book link to Facebook is really well made.

Score: 4

Multimedia

Google Nexus One:

The music player in the Nexus is the worst if you compare these four Android mobiles. Any fm radio is not available in the Nexus (although it is speculated that it would come in a later update). The good thing is, however, the picture gallery. It’s really neat, and it is easy to group photos and videos, which is also done automatically by date and geotaggad position.

Score: 4

HTC Legend:

A very nice camera, which, however, is worse than that in the X 10. HTC has posted good settings options in the camera for both Legend and big brother model Desire. Legend is exactly that Desire excellent integrated with Facebook and Flickr fotosajten when it comes to images. Not only is it easy to upload pictures. In the photo album menu is even, even friends ‘ updated photo album on Flickr and Facebook. In the Friendstream on home screen, you can also see when friends update pics. The music player is also good in HTC’s Androidlurar, and Legend also has FM radio built in.

Score: 4

Sony Ericsson X 10:

Multimedia is one of the main strengths of Sony Ericsson X 10 in this match. The camera in the X 10 is not quite on a par with Sony Ericsson’s best camera phones the Vivaz and Satio, but it’s good. It’s easy to share photos, for example, Facebook and Picasa. Another feature is that it is possible to namntagga photos, so that it points out the faces in the picture and connects to your phone’s address book, so that you can pick up all the pictures of a specific person. When the phone learned a face after a while the name tags on the images yourself. Even the music player is sharper than the competition. Listen to an artist can easily switch with the infinite button and get result list from Youtube and Google on the artist, and for instance listen on Youtube.

Rating: 5

Htc Desire:

The same camera as in Nexus, and it’s perfectly OK. However, the more fun with the photos you take. Desire is a mobile that is superbly integrated with Facebook and Flickr photo site when it comes to images. Not only is it easy to upload pictures. In the photo album menu is even, even friends ‘ updated photo album on Flickr and Facebook. In the Friendstream on home screen, you can also see when friends update pics. The music player is also good in HTC’s Androidlurar, and Desire have FM radio built in.

Rating: 5

Internet

Google Nexus One:

Nexus has a good browser, where you can zoom with both double knock on the screen and by “multitouch” by pinching with your fingers. Google Talk, Gmail, and Google Maps are other Internet-based applications that are located on your phone. But so much more extra features are not on the phone. Fortunately, there are a lot of internet software at software shop Market.

Score: 4

HTC Legend:

Visual bookmarks and the ability to look up words on Web pages directly in wikipedia by selecting the words with your finger. There are a couple of features that show how HTC working on the Android system’s already excellent Web browser. But all that glitters is not gold. It prompts you for Flash in mobile phones and browsers, so that one can look at the “real” SVT Play for example. Legend has support for real Flash, but you notice that the CPU is a bit too weak. It will be choppy. The browser also has “multitouch” to zoom by pinching with fingers on the screen.

Rating: 5

Sony Ericsson X 10:

Web browser in the X 10 is very good, and can customize the pages to the screen. Above all, it is convenient that it can wrap the body text and headings so you do not have to scroll sideways. But the browser is also really quick and easy to use. Google’s internet services is available as usual in Android with from the start. Connections to Sony Ericsson’s Playnow music store and integration with Facebook is the other stuff that makes the X 10 to one of the most full-featured internet headset right now.

Score: 4

Htc Desire:

HTC has improved on the standard browser in Android, among other things, with great-looking Visual bookmarks. There is also a widget that you can put on any of their home screens. One notable thing is that HTC also managed to build in support for real flash in the browser, so that, for example, flash functions and regular online video works in the browser. At Desire, it works decently well, thanks to the strong processor in the phone. The browser also has “multitouch” to zoom by pinching with fingers on the screen.

Rating: 5

Other:

Google Nexus One:

The power of the Nexus One over the other headphones in this test is probably the close connection to Google, which means it likely will be quite easy to install future updates of the Android system. A weakness is sync opportunities against other than Google’s own sync services online (Google Calendar, Google Contacts). Sure, there’s a moderately functional support for Exchange Sync, but otherwise, it’s probably one of the weaknesses with the Nexus in this comparison both HTC that Sony Ericsson has added enhanced syncing options of its Androids. Nexus is the only cell phone of those four where you can’t choose Swedish in the menus.

Score: 3

HTC Legend:

Legend has pluttigare screen than the other headset in the comparison. It is a disadvantage. On the other hand, better battery life, and that’s an advantage. It’s easy to get started with HTC’s pedagogical gude at boot time, where you fill in Google account, Facebook account, Flickr account, and more, if you have such accounts (otherwise you can create). But you can also log on to the Exchange Server, and get your contacts and email synced from your corporate server.

Score: 3

Sony Ericsson X 10:

A good bonus: Bluetooth headset with stereolurar and built-in FM radio also follows with the bargain when buying x 10. There are inlaid a program (Moxier) that supports push synchronization from an Exchange Server. This means that you can always have your current email, address book and calendar from the Office in your phone. That Google Maps has been complemented by the more full-featured GPS application Wisepilot (with voice-guided car navigation) is also good. For those of you who want to “multitouch” in the screen where you zoom by pinch with your fingers don’t get it in the X 10, but in the other three of the compared headset. However, other new features coming in an update of the software that Sony Ericsson is planning for all X 10 ‘s, eventually.

Rating:

4

Htc Desire:

HTC has a very pedagogical guide when starting the phone the first time. Where do you get, among other things, fill in Google account, Facebook account, Flickr account, and more, if you have such accounts (otherwise you can create). But you can also log on to the Exchange Server, and get your contacts and email synced from your corporate server.

Score: 3

Google Nexus One HTC Legend Sony Ericsson X 10 HTC Desire Form & ergonomics
Menus & features
Multimedia
Internet
Miscellaneous

Winner: Sony Ericsson and HTC

Google’s own Nexus One was hot when it arrived last winter. Now it has been clearly behind. But if you want a mobile with Android-which one to choose? If we take the X 10, Legend or Desire depends on what priority, I think. Think about it like this:

  1. Select Legend if you want great battery life and cruel quality feeling with the metal shell.
  2. Select X 10 If you prioritize a really comfortable big screen, good camera and nifty extras for multimedia (with good accompanying Cordless stereo handsfree).
  3. Select the Desire if you give priority to integration with social services such as Flickr, Facebook, and the ability to zoom on screen with pinch-to-zoom.

Footnote: Unfortunately, errors crept into the first version of the examination table. This is now fixed.